ReadyKids Center

Renderings Courtesy of BRW Architects

Renderings Courtesy of BRW Architects

Springpoint Structural is working with BRW Architects to expand the facility of a Charlottesville non-profit, ReadyKids. With their mission of “opening doors to bright futures for kids”, we are proud to be a part of their growth and progress.

The expansion consists of 2 two-story additions, one at each end of an existing building, totaling approximately 6,000 square feet of newly constructed space. Structural challenges with this project include cutting off a corner of the existing building to maintain compliance with city regulations and removing most of an exterior shear wall to accommodate open programming in the new space.

Construction is expected to begin in late 2018.

 

 

Renderings Courtesy of BRW Architects.

Renderings Courtesy of BRW Architects.

Centro Uno School - Guatemala

Image courtesy of Building Goodness Foundation

Image courtesy of Building Goodness Foundation

In the rural Mayan village of Centro Uno, there is no middle/high school building. Without a secondary school building, 80% of children in this village leave school before 9th grade. Building Goodness Foundation is partnering with the Ixtatan Foundation and the people of Centro Uno to create a culturally-appropriate, sustainable, intentionally-designed secondary school in Centro Uno.

While at Keast & Hood, Craig provided pro-bono structural engineering services for the project including a scouting trip to the remote town to understand local construction materials and techniques.  The project is a collaboration between Building Goodness, volunteer architects, engineers, and contractors in the Charlottesville area, the Ixtatan Foundation, and most importantly, the townspeople of Centro Uno, and Springpoint looks forward to continuing this effort into structural design.

Riverside Village

The Riverside Village mixed-use development provides commercial retail space at street level and luxury apartments on the two upper floors. It is uniquely situated between a major multi-lane road and private single-family homes. Developed by Stony Point Design Build in Charlottesville, VA, the Springpoint Structural team (previously Keast & Hood) worked with Wolf Ackerman to design three new nearly identical buildings on the site.  These buildings utilize podium construction for structural efficiency and economy, with a steel framed first floor and wood framing above. Construction is underway in summer 2018.

 

 

Rendering courtesy of Stony Point Design-Build and Wolf Ackerman.

Rendering courtesy of Stony Point Design-Build and Wolf Ackerman.

Peloton Station

Image courtesy of Martin Horn

Image courtesy of Martin Horn

Springpoint Structural is proud to be collaborating with architects Wolf Ackerman on the adaptive reuse and new additions for the Peloton Station at Charlottesville's rapidly changing 10th and Main neighborhood.  Phase 1 of the project adapts a classic car dealership for use as a very unique restaurant concept.  And Phase 2 will add two stories of new residential over street level commercial.  We'll add construction photos as they come!

Here's more from Martin Horn, the project general contractor:

http://www.martinhorn.com/shifting-gears-at-peloton-station/

And from Peloton themselves:  https://www.pelotonstation.com/

(Springpoint started this project as Keast & Hood)

 

1515 - University of Virginia Student Center

Rendering by Nall Architecture

Rendering by Nall Architecture

1515 University Avenue was constructed in the late 1800's as a private residence, and a significant later addition expanded it to front on University Avenue at the University of Virginia's historic "Corner". More recently, UVA acquired use of the building with the intent of providing a unique student-focused space in the area.

As an associate and project lead for Keast & Hood, Craig Swift provided frequent creative structural solutions throughout the project process. The building had a number of significant structural deficiencies, some anticipated ahead of time and many other found during the construction process, which were resolved with careful collaboration with the project architects and UVA in-house renovation contracting team.  Unique structural features included the strengthening of deficient original trusses to allow clear spans over newly configured second floor spaces, and a structural steel feature stair connecting three floors.

Click here for more photos from Nalls Architecture!

Aelywyck Cottage

Built in 1932 on Afton Mountain outside of Charlottesville, this stone cottage was the original location for Waynesboro Nurseries and became a popular destination for travelers passing by on the only road over the Blue Ridge mountain pass.  

SPRINGPOINT is collaborating with new owners to reimagine the cottage as a residence and retreat just outside of Shenandoah National Park.  SPRINGPOINT is providing assessments of historic masonry and wood framing, with a goal of untangling a progression of structural modifications to provide a newly open upper level while retaining the cottage's historic character.

Click here for historic images of the cottage!

Image courtesy of private owner

Image courtesy of private owner

Baltimore Basilica

Located in Baltimore, Maryland, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was constructed in the early 1800's under the direction of Benjamin Henry Latrobe.  A major renovation had recently been completed when the 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake caused significant damage to finishes and the heavy masonry structure.

Working as a project manager for Keast & Hood, Craig Swift led a design team to provide structural and architectural repairs to the historic building, carefully coordinated with the contractor team to allow continued operations on weekends (including masses and weddings).  The project won Baltimore Heritage's 2013 Restoration and Rehabilitation Award.

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Sherman Building

Located at the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington, D.C., the Sherman Building was constructed in three phases between 1852 and 1891. The building is the centerpiece of the site's National Historic Landmark status.

The 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake caused significant damage to the building, including dislodging parapet stones through the roof into classrooms below and onto adjacent cars and leaving the iconic clocktower in a state of near-collapse.

Working as a project manager for Keast & Hood, Craig Swift led post-earthquake structural assessments, repairs, and retrofits to the building, including a signature effort to reconstruct the clock tower with a steel frame work hidden from view.

Craig co-published an ASCE paper entitled "Evaluations, Repairs, and Retrofit of the Historic Sherman Building in Washington, DC, following the 2011 Mineral, VA, Earthquake" and presented the project at a 2015 ATC/SEI Conference in San Francisco, California on Improving the Seismic Performance of Existing Buildings. 

The project team was recognized with numerous awards, including the 2014 State Historic Preservation Officer Award in the DC Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation (video embedded at left)!

 

Photo taken by Craig Swift

Photo taken by Craig Swift